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Zika Facts

ZIKA FACTS ZIKA FACTS



    CDC Zika Facts.jpeg
  • The CDC maintains an updated list of #Zika-affected areas on their website at www.cdc.gov/zika.

     

  • Only about 1 in 5 people infected with #Zika will develop symptoms such as fever, rash, muscle pain and headache.

     

  • Illness from Zika is usually mild and most people feel better within a week.

     

  • Severe Zika requiring hospitalization is uncommon and deaths are rare.

     

  • Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus are found throughout the tropics so outbreaks will likely continue.

     

  • There is no vaccine or medicine for Zika at this time.

     

  • Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito.

     

  • The mosquitoes that can carry Zika are found in El Paso.

     

  • There’s no specific treatment for Zika. Treat symptoms by getting rest, drinking fluids, and taking acetaminophen.


ZIKA & VIRUS PREVENTIONZIKA FACTS



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  • The best way to protect yourself against Zika while traveling or simply outside at home is to prevent mosquito bites.

     

  • Use EPA-registered insect repellent to prevent #mosquito bites.

    http://www.epa.gov/insect-repellents/find-insect-repellent-right-you

     

  • Zika prevention: use insect repellent. Look for the following active ingredients: DEET, PICARIDIN, IR3535.

     

  • Wear protective clothes to prevent mosquito bites. For extra protection, treat clothing with permethrin.

     

  • Mosquito-proof your home by using screens on windows and doors. Use air conditioning when available.

     

  • Keep mosquitoes from laying eggs in and near standing water around your home to prevent breeding.

     

  • Help control mosquitoes that spread Zika, take the following steps: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/control_mosquitoes_chikv_denv_zika.pdf

     

  • If you use sunscreen, put sunscreen on first and insect repellent second.

     

  • When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are safe and effective, even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

     

  • Do not use insect repellent on infants under two months of age. Instead dress them in clothing that covers their arms and legs. 


ZIKA & VIRUS & PREGNANCYZIKA FACTS

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  • Zika can spread from a pregnant woman to her baby. It may cause microcephaly, a serious birth defect.

     

  • The CDC is recommending that pregnant women postpone travel to Zika-affected areas.

     

  • Zika infection during pregnancy is linked to birth defects in babies.

     

  • It is not known at this time if there is a safe time during your pregnancy with #Zika.

     

  • It is not known at this time if you do travel and get Zika how likely it is that your baby will have birth defects from the infection.

     

  • CDC recommends that pregnant women without symptoms of #Zika be tested 2-12 weeks after returning from Zika-affected areas.

     

  • CDC recommends that couples trying to get pregnant talk to a healthcare provider before traveling to Zika-affected areas. Stay informed and learn additional prevention methods that can help you have a health pregnancy. 


ZIKA & VIRUS & TRANSMISSIONZIKA FACTS

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  • Talk to your child about what the Zika virus is and how it can be prevented.

     

  • Emphasize the importance of wearing insect repellent when outside.

     

  • Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth and cut or irritated skin.
  • Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to your child’s face.

     

  • If your child participates in any outside sports or activities at school, remind them to apply insect repellent before going outside.

     

  • Dress your child in clothes in clothing that covers arms and legs.

     

  • Cover cribs, strollers and baby carriers with mosquito netting.

     

  • Encourage your child to help you mosquito proof your home by:
  • Emptying and throwing away standing water to keep mosquitoes from laying eggs.
  • Once a week, empty, turn over or cover, items that hold water such as tires, buckets, planters, toys, pools, birdbaths or trash containers.
  • Find and repair holes in screens to keep mosquitoes outside. 


ZIKA & VIRUS & CHILDRENZIKA FACTS

  • Talk to your child about what the Zika virus is and how it can be prevented.

     

  • Emphasize the importance of wearing insect repellent when outside.

     

  • Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth and cut or irritated skin.
  • Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to your child’s face.

     

  • If your child participates in any outside sports or activities at school, remind them to apply insect repellent before going outside.

     

  • Dress your child in clothes in clothing that covers arms and legs.

     

  • Cover cribs, strollers and baby carriers with mosquito netting.

     

  • Encourage your child to help you mosquito proof your home by:
  • Emptying and throwing away standing water to keep mosquitoes from laying eggs.
  • Once a week, empty, turn over or cover, items that hold water such as tires, buckets, planters, toys, pools, birdbaths or trash containers.
  • Find and repair holes in screens to keep mosquitoes outside. 


ZIKA & VIRUS & TRANSMISSIONZIKA FACTS

    CDC Zika Facts.jpeg
    • #1 thing you can do to prevent the Zika virus is to stay informed! Visit and follow trusted sources of information. Keep yourself current and updated on the latest news and prevention ideas by visiting the links below.